Russia's new 'disconnect from the internet' law is actually about surveillance

russia data center

Today, a new “internet sovereignty” law entered into effect in Russia, a law that grants the government the ability to disconnect the entire country from the global internet.

The law was formally approved by President Putin back in May. The Kremlin government cited the need to have the ability to disconnect Russia’s cyberspace from the rest of the world in the event of a national emergency or foreign threat, such as a cyberattack.

In order to achieve these goals, the law mandates that all local ISPs route traffic through special servers managed by the Roskomnadzor, the country’s telecoms regulator.

These servers would act as kill-switches and disconnect Russia from external connections while re-routing internet traffic inside Russia’s own internet space, akin to a country-wide intranet — which the government is calling RuNet.

The Kremlin’s recent law didn’t come out of the blue. Russian officials have been working on establishing RuNet for more than half a decade. Past efforts included passing laws that force foreign companies to keep the data of Russian citizens on servers located in Russia.

However, internet infrastructure experts have called Russia’s “disconnect plan” both impractical and idealistic, pointing to the global DNS system as the plan’s Achille’s heel.

Even US officials doubt that Russia would be able to pull it off. Speaking on stage at the RSA 2019 security conference in March, NSA Director General Paul Nakasone said he didn’t expect Russia to succeed and disconnect from the global internet.

The technicalities of disconnecting an entire country are just to complex not to cripple Russia’s entire economy, plunging modern services like healthcare or banking back into a dark age.

It’s a law about surveillance, not sovereignty

The reality is that experts in Russian politics, human rights, and internet privacy have come up with a much more accurate explanation of what’s really going on.

Russia’s new law is just a ruse, a feint, a gimmick. The law’s true purpose is to create a legal basis to force ISPs to install deep-packet inspection equipment on their networks and force them to re-route all internet traffic through Roskomnadzor strategic chokepoints.

These Roskomnadzor servers are where Russian authorities will be able to intercept and filter traffic at their discretion and with no judicial oversight, similar to China’s Great Firewall.

The law is believed to be an upgrade to Russia’s SORM (System for Operative Investigative Activities). But while SORM provides passive reconnaissance capabilities, allowing Russian law enforcement to retrieve traffic metadata from ISPs, the new “internet sovereignty” law provides a more hands-on approach, including active traffic shaping capabilities.

Experts say the law was never about internet sovereignty, but about legalizing and disguising mass surveillance without triggering protests from Russia’s younger population, who has gotten accustomed to the freedom the modern internet provides.

Experts at Human Rights Watch have seen through the law’s true purpose ever since it was first proposed in the Russian Parliament. Earlier this year, they’ve called the law “very broad, overly vague, and [that it vests] in the government unlimited and opaque discretion to define threats.”

This vagueness in the law’s text allows the government to use it whenever it wishes, for any circumstance.

Many have pointed out that Russia is doing nothing more than copying the Beijing regime, which also approved a similarly vague law in 2016, granting its government the ability to take any actions it sees fit within the country’s cyberspace.

The two countries have formally cooperated, with China providing help to Russia in implementing a similar Great Firewall technology.

Planned disconnect test

But while Russia’s new law entered into effect today, officials sill have to carry out a ton of tests. Last week, the Russian government published a document detailing a scheduled test to take place this month.

No exact date was provided. Sources at three Russian ISPs have told ZDNet this week that they haven’t been notified of any such tests; however, if they take place, they don’t expect the “disconnect” to last more than a few minutes.

Tens of thousands protested this new law earlier this year across Russia; however, the government hasn’t relented, choosing to arrest protesters and go forward with its plans.

About the author

E-Crypto News was developed to assist all cryptocurrency investors in developing profitable cryptocurrency portfolios through the provision of timely and much-needed information. Investments in cryptocurrency require a level of detail, sensitivity, and accuracy that isn’t required in any other market and as such, we’ve developed our databases to help fill in information gaps.

Related Posts

E-Crypto News Executive Interviews



bitcoin
Bitcoin (BTC) $ 62,100.00
ethereum
Ethereum (ETH) $ 3,892.17
binance-coin
Binance Coin (BNB) $ 479.71
cardano
Cardano (ADA) $ 2.21
tether
Tether (USDT) $ 1.00
xrp
XRP (XRP) $ 1.15
solana
Solana (SOL) $ 158.76
polkadot
Polkadot (DOT) $ 43.68
usd-coin
USD Coin (USDC) $ 1.00
dogecoin
Dogecoin (DOGE) $ 0.239003
USD
EUR
GBP
bitcoinBitcoin (BTC)
$ 62,100.00
ethereumEthereum (ETH)
$ 3,892.17
tetherTether (USDT)
$ 1.00
bitcoin-cashBitcoin Cash (BCH)
$ 629.35
litecoinLitecoin (LTC)
$ 189.94
bitcoinBitcoin (BTC)
53.484,56
ethereumEthereum (ETH)
3.352,19
tetherTether (USDT)
0,861265
bitcoin-cashBitcoin Cash (BCH)
542,04
litecoinLitecoin (LTC)
163,59
bitcoinBitcoin (BTC)
45,333.31
ethereumEthereum (ETH)
2,841.30
tetherTether (USDT)
0.730005
bitcoin-cashBitcoin Cash (BCH)
459.43
litecoinLitecoin (LTC)
138.66

Automated trading with HaasBot Crypto Trading Bots

Crypto Scams

Crypto Scams
Crypto Scams Still Persistent In 2021, SEC Warns About Red Flags To Watch
September 9, 2021
Poly Network
Here’s How Hackers Stole Over $600 million in the Poly Network Attack
August 12, 2021
The World’s Most Infamous Crypto Hacks and Scams
July 31, 2021
Cryptocurrency Exchanges
Cryptocurrency Exchanges and the Plague of Scams and Bans
June 29, 2021
What Role Do Cryptocurrencies Play In The Era Of Ransomware Attacks?
June 9, 2021

Blockchain/Cryptocurrency Questions and Answers

ICo Presale
The Science Behind ICO Presales…
October 14, 2021
Beginner’s Guide to Investing in Cryptocurrency
August 9, 2021
Short-Sell Cryptocurrency
How to Short-Sell Cryptocurrency: A Brief Overview
July 17, 2021
Klaytn
What Is Klaytn (KLAY) And How Does It Work?
July 16, 2021
Cryptocurrencies
Our Crypto Roundup Interview Asks- Do Cryptocurrencies Have a Future?
July 15, 2021


CryptoCurrencyUSDChange 1hChange 24hChange 7d
Bitcoin61,682 0.44 % 4.21 % 14.20 %
Ethereum3,916.2 1.48 % 3.45 % 10.05 %
Binance Coin479.05 0.14 % 4.19 % 14.52 %
Cardano2.220 0.42 % 2.18 % 0.52 %
Tether0.9986 0.03 % 0.08 % 0.23 %
XRP1.150 0.63 % 2.22 % 7.97 %
Solana159.76 0.77 % 1.70 % 0.53 %
Polkadot30.87 2.19 % 17.29 % 10.73 %
USD Coin1.000 0.14 % 0.20 % 0.17 %
Dogecoin0.2384 0.03 % 4.48 % 1.89 %

bitcoin
Bitcoin (BTC) $ 62,100.00
ethereum
Ethereum (ETH) $ 3,892.17
binance-coin
Binance Coin (BNB) $ 479.71
cardano
Cardano (ADA) $ 2.21
tether
Tether (USDT) $ 1.00
xrp
XRP (XRP) $ 1.15
solana
Solana (SOL) $ 158.76
polkadot
Polkadot (DOT) $ 43.68
usd-coin
USD Coin (USDC) $ 1.00
dogecoin
Dogecoin (DOGE) $ 0.239003